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Friday Happy Hour: Effortlessly Impress With an Exotic Corn n’ Oil Cocktail

Friday Happy Hour: Effortlessly Impress With an Exotic Corn n’ Oil Cocktail
Corn N' Oil by Patrick Bennett
Corn N’ Oil by Patrick Bennett

Corn n’ Oil may not have the most pleasant moniker, but what it lacks in title, it more than makes up for in seductively sweet flavor. Plus with only two ingredients, this cocktail can instantly add some exotic Bajan goodness to any occasion.

John D. Taylor’s Velvet Falernum by Patrick Bennett
John D. Taylor’s Velvet Falernum by Patrick Bennett

The first main ingredient is an exotic, 200 year-old native of Barbados: falernum. A liqueur made basically from rum, lime and sugar — falernum is an almost candy-like, mostly clear, sweet syrup. (It also has some egg whites, clove and botanicals in there, too.) My go to falernum is John D. Taylor’s Velvet Falernum from our friends at R.L. Seale & Co. It’s been around since 1890 and considered by many as the original bottled falernum. You can find it practically anywhere when you’re on Barbados, but it’s much more rare once you return stateside, so be sure to stock up on your next trip!

The second ingredient, you might be able to guess: rum. 

In this case, the recipe calls for black strap (like Cruzan Black Strap Rum) presumably to play the part of the “oil” in the name. And well… you can make it that way… It’s certainly the authentic way to do it… But if you’ve read enough of these Friday Happy Hours, you know we’re not huge fans of the black stuff, so I prefer to substitute plain-old dark rum instead. (In this case, I used Old Brigand Rum to keep with the Bajan theme!)

Once you have your two ingredients, mixing is a breeze. 

I like to keep it simple: 1 part of one ingredient and 2 parts the other.

If you prefer a more rumtastic beverage, put 2 parts rum and 1 part falernum. If you prefer a sweeter cocktail, just flip it: 2 parts falernum and 1 part rum. Mix over lots of ice, stir vigorously (it needs to be cold), then add a dash of Angostura bitters. If you chose to use black strap, I’d recommend squeezing and dropping in a lime wedge.

And just like that, you’ve got a dark, exotic, Bajan sweety worth sharing… Or keeping all to yourself!

Cheers!

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