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Mule Point Beach, TCI | SBPR
Providenciales, Turks and Caicos

Kicking It at Mule Point on Providenciales, Turks and Caicos

Kicking It at Mule Point on Providenciales, Turks and Caicos

If you visited Provo and never left Grace Bay – a distinct possibility for many, no doubt – then you might not believe that the image above could actually be snapped on the same island, much less a quick drive away.

This is Mule Point Beach, a remote stretch of sand and sea grass at the extreme northwestern corner of the island.

To get here, you literally have to drive to the end of the road, that road being the Millennium Highway, which connects to Provo’s Leeward Highway to create one big smile of a thoroughfare running the entire length of the island.

We didn’t find any mules when we visited Mule Point this past June. In fact, we didn’t really find anything at all; just piles of sea grass so matted and mixed with sand that it was impossible to tell where one substance stopped and the other one started.

Super-secluded Mule Point Beach on Provo, Turks and Caicos | SBPR
Super-secluded Mule Point Beach on Provo, Turks and Caicos | SBPR

The sweetly supple shores of Grace Bay these were not.

Still, Mule Point made for a nice little discovery, the wife and I taking advantage of the absolute seclusion and clear-cool water for a spell in ways most folks back on Grace Bay might not have appreciated…

Note: Like Pirates Cove at the far southwestern corner of Provo, Mule’s Point is very remote, so you’ll want to exercise the same type of caution we mention here if you decide to check it out.

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  • David M. Morrill

    Back in the late 90s when my parents lived on Provo we often made the drive on Malcolm road to Malcolm Road beach and the tikis huts. At that time this was the only part of the northwest end accessible by vehicle and a 4w drive was needed. The tiki huts were built for a French survivor-style game show and were left in place after production ended. It was a wonderful place to spend the day as there never was anyone else there. Great place for a picnic and exploring. We have often wondered what happened to the tikis huts. My guess is that they were located where Amanyara is today and the resort razed them. Great memories of that part of the island.